Body camera technology evolves as demand for cameras grow

LAS VEGAS - After deadly confrontations with police in cities like Ferguson, Missouri and Baltimore, Maryland many people say making officers wear body cameras is a quick solution to provide more transparency. 

Metro Police says their body camera program has worked for them, but the body camera technology keeps changing.

The International Body-Worn Camera Symposium revealed how body camera technology continues to evolve, so the demand for the products continue to grow. 

"Our largest deployment to date is over 1,500 officers," said Gary Nickol, Reveal USA.

Currently, there are multiple models being offered to law enforcement officers all over around the world. 

"I can do a remote start on a recording."

Some of the new technology allows body cameras to activate when the emergency lights are switched on.

"You're essentially making it, so the decision isn't only up to the officer, said Anthony Baldoni, Utility Body Worn.

In the meantime, other companies are working to make sure the video captures as much as possible.

"For us, that means a field of view that mimics as close as possible to the human eye," said Quenton Seamons, Safety Innovations International.

One former police chief says body cameras will show how tough police work is.
 
"The very seriousness and dangers of this particular job are not only physical, but mental," Former Chief Alan Youngs, said Lakewood Police Department.

Metro Police says body cams are clearing officers of wrongdoing.

"Since October, from the full implementation of the 200 cameras, we've had at least two dozen internal cases of allegations of use of force dispelled," said Sheriff Joe Lombardo, Clark County.

But not every Metro Officer has been given a body camera.  Cost is still a problem for the department. 

The camera's cost $1,300 a piece.  Metro said it can't afford to give a body camera to every officer.

On Wednesday, Governor Brian Sandoval, R-NV, plans to sign a bill that will require Nevada Highway Patrol Troopers to wear body cameras.  More than 400 troopers will get them for a total cost of about $1.3 million.


 


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