Flood control project on Mt. Charleston moving forward

MT. CHARLESTON, Nv. -- A temporary fix is on the way to help the people whose homes were destroyed by flash flooding on Mount Charleston a year ago. The state has decided to move forward with a flood control project that would divert the water away from the properties.

The Army Corps of Engineers was ready to build the temporary structure at the beginning of June, but Clark County lawyers put a stop to it over concerns that the county would be liable if the structure failed.

Governor Brian Sandoval announced Monday the state will accept liability so the project can move ahead.

Without the flood control berm, when it rains, water pours down Rainbow Canyon Boulevard washing out the road and flooding homes. The berm is expected to last 10 to 12 years and construction is set to begin in a few weeks.

The Rainbow subdivision has been hit hard by flash flooding over the last two monsoon seasons, after the Carpenter One fire destroyed natural vegetation barriers.

Sandoval made his announcement in front of one of the homes that was condemned last month after flooding.

"It's incredible. You have to witness it to understand what's happening," said Duffy Grismanauskas, Mount Charleston resident.

Many in the Rainbow subdivision have been waiting since May for the flood control project. Questions of whether local government or the state would shoulder the liability delayed the project.

"This will be built and completed before the snow falls. So we should start seeing work done in the next couple of weeks," Governor Sandoval said.

Clark County will maintain the temporary structure while the state will assume any liability costs. 8 News NOW asked the governor if there was any dollar amount or cap to what state taxpayers could be responsible for if something goes wrong with the berm.

"I don't want to get lost in this. Liability and cap and that type of issue," Sandoval said. "I mean, the issue is getting this built."

Sandoval says the neighborhood is in desperate need of a quick fix and lives are in danger if that doesn't happen.

Rodney Dukes home is still damaged almost beyond repair. Even with the promise of this project, he's still preparing for more rain.

"We're still in the flood season for another month. So we could get another hit before then," he said.

It will cost Clark County around $800,000 to maintain the project.

 



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