Harvey's flood victims speak out from Houston

LAS VEGAS - A floodwaters continue to rise in Texas, the nation and the Las Vegas valley is starting to hear more from Tropical Storm Harvey's victims.
 
8 News NOW spoke with flooding victims in the Houston area Monday, and many of them are living with the knowledge that they could lose everything, while others feel completely trapped by the rising waters.

"We're so maxed out we can't take anymore," said Esther Burchert, Hurricane Harvey flood victim.  "We just can't take any more."

Tropical Storm Harvey strengthened into a hurricane over the Gulf of Mexico last week before making landfall northeast of Corpus Christi, Tex., on Friday. However, the evacuation process didn't ramp up until Sunday.

"All of a sudden we had to evacuate because they said the Brasus River would be going above the flood stage," according to Kathy Clayton-Keene, Richmond, Texas.

"We are in uncharted territory here in Houston," Burchert said.
"We've never seen this.  "We don't know what's going to happen."

Clayton-Keene says she was evacuated from her home near the river at 2 a.m. Monday.  Clayton-Keene says she's now staying at her parents home nearby, but she's worried flooding may hit them as well.

"I asked my father, 'do we have a plan b,' and he said 'no we do not have a plan b.' Our plan is to go up on the roof and just pray that we don't have to get there," said Clayton-Keene.

Shabazz Nathan has been in dangerous flood waters before.  Nathan said she evacuated out of New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina.  She said she was also rescued from her home during Hurricane Isaac in 2012.

"In that storm, I was rescued at night by boat at nighttime with my parents and some other family members; some I still don't know their names," Nathan said. "I've never seen them again, and I've always wanted to say thank them for that, but I've never been able to."

Before leaving her home in search of higher ground, Nathan said she put her belongings on her bed of her home in Sugarland, which is in the southwest Houston area. 

Many people who have experienced major storms in the past say the big difference between this storm and others is the ability to get information.  They say because Houston is such a big city, in many cases, there is some sort of access to local television, access to cell phones and internet, but that size also has a drawback.  Many flood victims say that massive citywide evacuations before the storm hit would have been completely impossible.

 


 


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