Hot weather brings summer pests

LAS VEGAS - The hot and humid weather outside might be bringing bugs into your home. Many insects and arachnids are active in the summer as they seek food, water and shelter.

Currently, the most invasive and active pests are ants and scorpions. Roaches, beetles and spiders are also more likely to appear during the summer months.

Zoologists say bark scorpions are a problem, because they are poisonous. They live throughout the southwest and like dark and moist places. Bark scorpions are most active at night. When the sun is out, they hide under rocks and loose tree barks.

According to the Food and Drug Administration, bark scorpion stings are rarely life-threatening, but they can be painful. Symptoms include: fever, vomiting and skin irritation.

U.S. poison centers nationwide report approximately 17,000 stings every year. Most of those occur in the southwestern U.S.

"Nobody is really safe from finding those," said zoologist Thomas O'Toole. "If you have some really creative landscaping, you might have them in your back yard. They're really attracted to different water sources, other creepy crawlers, roaches, beetles, that sort of thing."

Bark scorpions can be hard to spot at night or in dark places, but they glow under a black light.

As for ants, they are not dangerous, but they can be a nuisance when they invade your home. Spiders can also be problematic.

Ross Hunsaker with Progressive Pest Control says if you spot a spider inside your home, it's most likely not alone.

"If you have a presence of spiders on a property, more than likely, you have a food source for them, whether it be crickets or cockroaches," he said.

Exterminators say pest infestations always start outside. Maintaining your lawn is crucial to keeping bugs out of your home. Clear any debris and trash from your property – inside and outside.

Pests can access your home through an open water or gas line. They can also come in through the foundation of a home.

Hunsaker says the easiest way to get rid of pests is to remove their source of food. You can also use over-the-counter bug killers, but Hunsaker says they will not eliminate an infestation problem.


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