I-Team: Boulder City's administrative officer slapped with fine for sleeping in city building

LAS VEGAS - The number two man in Boulder City's government admitted Wednesday that, for several months, he used a city building as his personal motel room.  The details were revealed at a hearing of the Nevada Commission On Ethics, which stipulated a $1,000 fine as punishment.

The latest Boulder City official to be nailed for ethical transgressions is Bryce Boldt. He's the administrative officer, the number two guy in the city's government. 

For at least eight months, Boldt spent three nights per week sleeping in a building adjacent to city hall.  However, it stopped when residents grew suspicious.

Last January, hours after the entire city council and other department heads in Boulder City underwent a state-ordered lesson in ethics laws, someone used a key card to access the building adjacent to City Hall. 

From one angle, the building looks like a public restroom, but on the opposite side, it is a storage facility for employee records, but to longtime human resources director, now administrative officer Boldt, it was home. 

A complaint filed with the ethics commission led to a Wednesday agenda item about Boldt. Commissioners agreed to fine Boldt $1,000 because he used public property for his personal benefit.  The evidence shows Boldt entered the building after hours on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday nights, from July 2016 through Feb. 2017. 

The building was Boldt's personal flophouse. Boldt earns $167,000 per year in salary and benefits but started using the building after he sold his Nevada home and moved to Scottsdale, Arizona. 

Residents began to suspect he was commuting to work, so they requested his key card records to prove it. Sure enough, the records showed Boldt arriving 30-90 minutes late for work on most Mondays, entering the building in the evenings, and then by Thursday, he was back in Arizona.  

After the records request was made, city officials suspended Boldt for two days without pay, but residents filed an ethics complaint, which led to an investigation. 

"Mr. Boldt used his key card to enter the storage area on a daily basis, including 162 times after the end of normal working hours over the course of 80 days," said Judy Pressman, Counsel for Ethics Commission.

Boldt attended the ethics meeting by phone. The commission was told he cooperated with the investigation and agreed to pay the fine. 

Two commissioners felt the fine wasn't enough and wanted a full hearing, but they were outvoted.

"Sounds like we have one count, one wilful violation but we aren't sure how many times he spent the night and used this city facility for his lodging, which I find totally unacceptable," said Phillip O'Neill, Nevada Ethics Commission.   

Bryce Boldt still works full time for Boulder City, and he still lives in another state.  His ethics complaint comes on the heels of a string of legal and ethical issues involving Boulder City honchos including two mayors, a council member, city attorney, police administrator, and animal control officer. 

The city manager resigned soon after the flophouse issue surfaced. And twice, the top echelon of city government was ordered by the state to undergo ethics training. 
 


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