I-Team: SPEEDVEGAS responds to lawsuits, OSHA report and critics

LAS VEGAS - SPEEDVEGAS, a luxury race car track that has been open for a little more than a year has already been the scene of a deadly wreck; it's faced lawsuits and has been the subject of an OSHA investigation.
   
So has any of this affected SPEEDVEGAS' business?  Johnny McMahon, chief operating officers for SPEEDVEGAS, said last year there were about 40,000 customers at the track.

The chief operating officer says business is growing.  He also insists that the track that has been open since April 2016 is safe.

The cause of the crash that killed a driving instructor and Canadian tourist in Feb. 2017 is still unknown. But what is known is that the Lamborghini somehow lost control.

"We did not have a track that was unsafe, or any of the methods that we do were unsafe," said Johnny McMahon, chief operating officers for SPEEDVEGAS.

Vanessa Murphy, I-Team Reporter:  "There were questions about the vehicle from February.  What can you say about that?  Were the brakes replaced?  Were there different parts? What can you say about that?"
McMahon: "I have no comment on that.  I mean, I just have... we're...  no."

SPEEDVEGAS is being sued by one of the victim's in the deadly crash family.

OSHA just wrapped up its investigation of the company and recommended a $16,000 fine, along with improvements in training and fire safety.

Murphy: "Are you increasing the response?"
McMahon:  "We'll continue to increase safety every chance we get an opportunity for -- if there are new and better ways to keep our customers safe, but at this point we're doing everything we've hired experts to teach us and help us along the way to make sure we're doing it as safe as possible.

SPEEDVEGAS has also faced criticism for the track's design.
Some industry insiders say the turns are too sharp and there's not enough room for mistakes.  OSHA didn't find anything wrong with the track design, but in its report, it was determined there were no applicable standards.

"They're not like a governing body of driving experiences to per say, but their job is to keep all workplaces safe, so they do have at least an idea from a common sense standpoint of how to keep everyone safer, and they do a really good job at that," said McMahon.

SPEEDVEGAS' track is the place where an average joe can come and drive an exotic car at high speeds with an instructor in the passenger seat who can take control when necessary.

OSHA investigates if someone is hurt or dies at a workplace, but there's no agency regularly overseeing attractions like SPEEDVEGAS.

"It's just one of these unique things that there is no real oversight committee that has exact rules and regulations, but we would never be opposed to making our product safer," McMahon said.

McMahon says SPEEDVEGAS isn't necessarily disputing the recommended $16,000 fine from OSHA, but there is a meeting planned this week with SPEEDVEGAS staff and an OSHA representatives to go over the agency's findings.

 


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