Nevada's law on deadly force

By Christianne Klein

Published 12/07 2016 02:15PM

Updated 12/07 2016 02:15PM

Raad Sunna
Raad Sunna/Copyright 2016 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

The news that Raad Sunna is facing murder charges in the death of 13-year-old Fabriccio Patti, it's raising new concerns for gun owners as to when it's appropriate to use deadly force.

Nevada state law is very clear on this issue.

In order to justify the use of deadly force in self-defense, a reasonable person in a similar situation must believe they are in imminent danger of great bodily harm or death. 

The key, according to defense attorneys, is the surveillance video from inside the smoke shop. 

Metro Lt. Dan McGrath said, the three teens were not armed and the clerk, Raad Sunna fired at them eight or nine times.

McGrath said he had two concerns before they watched the video; the number of times Sunna fired his weapon and the distance between him and the teens.

After watching the video, officers believed they had probable cause to charge Sunna with murder.

"What we saw on video was three young men, or kids. They're kids basically, enter the business and they stopped to grab merchandise. At that point it was our assessment that Mr. Sunna was not in jeopardy, not being threatened when they stopped to grab the property. They never made it up close to him at all, not even close. They did rush in but then they stopped to grab certain items," Lt. Dan McGrath said.

Defense attorneys say it's up to gun owners to know the law and act reasonably. 

It is unknown if the teens said anything to Sunna or if he was fearful they would come back into the business.

 

Copyright 2016 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.